As part two of our series, Tony Issakov offers a few thoughts when developing on RubyMotion.

rubymotion

Whilst I spend a lot of time in a management role, I’m a developer at heart that cannot stop developing. Here’s a few things that I’ve come across in the RubyMotion space that may be of use.

1: Know the code you are building on

RubyMotion is a relatively young space that is filling quickly with enthusiastic Ruby developers. New gems are coming out regularly to carry over what we know from our native Ruby world and also to make new iOS capabilities more comfortable to access.

One thing to be aware of is that being a new space there are some fairly fresh pieces of code being integrated into common use and some of them haven’t had much time to mature. For this reason I suggest taking a moment to get to know the gems you are about to use.Octocat

Just as with any code, Github gives us a good place to start, checking out the most recent commit activity, the scale of the issues and hopefully checking that there’s a test suite. Whilst testing isn’t as fully fledged for RubyMotion, an attempt to test is a great start.

Reviewing how code is written has also been very informative. If you want to get some diverse exposure, start looking through BubbleWrap, the ever growing mixed bag of RubyMotion functionality. You can see anything from how to leverage the Camera through to observers with the Notification Centre. It gave me some ideas as a ruby developer of what iOS topics I needed to start researching.

2: Memory Matters

One major change moving into the RubyMotion space from a Rails one is that it’s no longer a stateless environment, pages aren’t a regularly discarded entity and what you do over time can mean something. If you don’t know about reference counting in iOS and the commonly mentioned ARC, it’s worth doing a little homework to understand what RubyMotion is doing for you. Apple provides some documentation explaining memory management, here.

One example of why it’s good to know this is I hit a show stopping moment when I started attaching view content from an 3rd party framework to my own controller objects using instance variables. The external library counted on the releasing of those objects as the app moved through multiple sessions and I was inadvertently retaining them. This ended up in some interesting crashes and the word ‘release’ is a real give away.

A protip here (offered initially to me by Jordan Maguire) was to leverage the dealloc method. If you override a class’s dealloc method, clear up your instance variables, put in a bit of logging whilst you are there and then call out to super, in theory your RubyMotion console should give you a bit of feedback that your app is being healthy about releasing it’s memory.

Another key object to figure out for this topic is WeakRef.

The need for WeakRefs comes up when you start passing delegates around and begin to form cyclic references which if not handled well, can in the least cause memory leaks. Wrapping an object in a WeakRef object gives you a programmatic way of ensuring you release an object and again look to the console for that dealloc feedback.

3: Think ‘Performance’

One of the major benefits of RubyMotion is taking a lot of ruby ideas for making code easy to write. One catch is that a lot of layers of abstraction can create the opportunity for a performance hit.

We saw this first hand when first trying gems like Teacup (a gem for layout and styling). When the gem was pretty young, people using it noticed their apps start to grind and scrolling through tables suffered a stutter. This came down to doing things in a programmatic but performance expensive way when styling table cells. From what I’ve seen many of these issues have been resolved and that has come down to both gem improvements and better patterns for developers applying code in a performance friendly way.

One paragraph that really stuck in my head on this topic was reading through the Queries section of the CDQ gem README. CDQ is a slick Core Data helper and the paragraph reads:

Core Data is designed to work efficiently when you hang on to references to specific objects and use them as you would any in-memory object, letting Core Data handle your memory usage for you. If you’re coming from a server-side rails background, this can be pretty hard to get used to, but this is a very different environment.

This sums up my very first moments of walking into RubyMotion from rails which was iOS persistence is handle by Core Data therefore Core Data equals ActiveRecord. We keep pushing the point but it’s not that Core Data isn’t ActiveRecord, its that things like persistence and what it means to each environment are very different.

4: IDE is not a bad word

Vim versus Emacs? How much finger twister can you play to do fairly amazing things with your editor? I’ve been sucked into this a few times over the years and will admit I find myself in the vim space largely because it was the editor I was raised on. In recent times I followed the Textmate to Sublime migration too. For a time though I found myself in the Java community working with IBM’s Application Developer and that’s where I came to terms with what an IDE is.

When I started to explore RubyMotion and got sucked into the “What editors can I use next?” game, I dabbled with RubyMine and was a little surprised. IDEs for me in the past have meant memory bloat and user interface lag but the JetBrains guys have done a great job optimising resource usage and letting you customise behavior.

Ruby_on_Rails_IDE____JetBrains_RubyMine

Why bring this up for RubyMotion? For many who are looking for some form of visual assistance, a nice refactoring capability, a debugger that is interactive, a spec runner that is visual, this might be a good tool for you to consider to give you a safety-net as you develop. This is absolutely not for everyone but I generally take all the help I can get and regularly swap back and forth between command line and visual tools depending on the task at hand.

5: The simulator is not the device

The iOS simulator is rather amazing in what it offers. A highly performant version of the device that you can swap between device types, screens, resolutions and even simulate events with. With all this it does lure you into believing it’ll be an effortless trip to the device but we found there are a few catches.

The first was that sometimes the simulator outperformed the phone and this is due to the simulator having the full resources of the host available to it. A few of our animations that were smooth on the simulator stuttered slightly and it was during a series of changes that it occurred.iOS_Simulator_User_Guide__About_iOS_Simulator

Another situation was when using external Objective C libraries, it’s possible for the library to have different branches of code depending on the environment meaning that the code you run in the simulator is not necessarily the code you will run on the device. In one extreme case we actually needed to set some custom build flags for the app to even compile for the device.

So the recommendation here is run on the device and frequently enough that if the app has some unusual explosion you aren’t left wondering which of the many gems you just added or commits you just made has cause the issue.